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Issue 8, May 2018
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Faculty Spotlight: Dr. Scott Wilson
Professor and Associate Dean for Global Education Scott Wilson recently received a grant that will support research on a water pollution monitoring project in China. The ASIANetwork Freeman Fellowship Program grant will allow Drs. Wilson of the Politics Department and Deborah McGrath of the Biology Department to take students to China over the summer to begin this collaborative research project. 
 
Sponsored Research Office student assistant Haven Watson recently talked with Dr. Wilson about the award.  Dr. Wilson first became interested in work in China over 30 years ago during his undergraduate years. Nanjing University, a prestigious university with whom the students and faculty will be partnering with over the summer, is actually the university he first visited when going to China for his undergraduate abroad experience. For this program, the students will research water pollution in China from scientific and social scientific approaches. Thus, the students will be involved in taking and analyzing water samples for pollution levels as well as creating questionnaires for the citizens regarding water pollution monitoring and reduction.
 
This will be Dr. Wilson’s second time receiving this grant, and he is very excited to be going back to China. Not only will the selected students be learning beneficial skills with the program, the program also ties in well with a three-year project he has been working on regarding environmental pollution in China.
 
For faculty searching and applying for grants, Dr. Wilson recommends pairing available opportunities with projects that faculty have had in the back of their minds and being entrepreneurial about the process. 
Student Spotlight: Four Sewanee Students Present Rhetoric Papers
Four Sewanee students presented rhetorical criticism papers at the Theodore Clevenger Undergraduate Honors Conference in Nashville last month. The Clevenger conference, one of the oldest and most prestigious undergraduate research forums in the field of rhetoric, attracts students from as far away as the University of Puget Sound and Florida Atlantic University and nearly everywhere in between. All papers are competitively selected for presentation. The Sewanee contributions emerged from research projects in RHET 311: U.S. Public Address, 1620-1865, a course that surveys American rhetoric and oratory of the period. Each paper offers a close reading of a speech or rhetorical controversy in its historical context.
 
Chris Ryan (’18) investigates attempts by Raphael Semmes, a Confederate military officer and envoy to Morocco, to influence British Consul to Morocco John Drummond Hay. Ryan, an International & Global Studies major, Politics minor, and Center for Speaking & Listening Advisory Board member, focuses his attention on a letter Semmes crafted in an attempt to alter Morocco’s long and cordial relations with the United States.
 
Cole Porter (’19), a Carey Fellow and Center for Speaking & Listening Tutor (and a finalist in last year’s inaugural Public Speaking contest), is pursuing an Economics major with Spanish and Honors Business minors. His paper, “Brooks and the Re-Occupation of Public Morality,” considers Phillips Brooks’ Thanksgiving Day sermon of 1863 as an instance of the “rhetoric of public moral argument,” and studies the text through the lens of “rhetorical depiction.” 

Julia Siebert, a Psychology major and Business minor, presented “A Rhetorical Criticism of ‘The Murder of Lovejoy,’ by Wendell Phillips.” In it Siebert reconsiders Phillips’ now famous oration on mob violence and pro-slavery rhetoric, arguing that depictions of savagery and inhumanity quite clearly highlighted the inhumanity of the pro-slavery position and functioned to stigmatize those who sought to expand slavery to newly created states.
 
William Merriman’s paper, “Reconstituting a Transcendent University: Rhetorical Criticism of William Giles Dix’s ‘An Address’,” was named the outstanding paper of the conference – out of 139 student submissions. Merriman (’19), an English major, Honors Business minor, Carey Fellow, and Center for Speaking & Listening Tutor, was named a “Clevenger Scholar,” an honor bestowed on authors of papers ranked in the top 10% of the conference, and won the Franklin Shirley Prize for best paper, a first for a Sewanee student. Merriman’s paper offers a close reading of Dix’s 1859 oration, delivered at Beersheba Springs, Tennessee, on the need for a new university to be called “The University of the South.”
 
Professors Sean O’Rourke (Rhetoric & American Studies) and Professor Melody Lehn (Rhetoric and Women’s & Gender Studies), both with the Center for Speaking & Listening, accompanied the students to Nashville. Lehn received the Dwight L. Freshley Award for Outstanding Teaching at the conference. 

See this article for more information.        
Water-related Research Grant from the Arthur Vining Davis Foundations
 
A $350,000 grant from the Arthur Vining Davis Foundations will support water-related research over the next three years. Called the Sewanee Headwaters Initiative, the initiative is directed by Amy Turner and Ken Smith. A key part of the grant is hiring a research manager who can both assist faculty in research design and implementation and who will disseminate findings to the public. Research can be related to water, water quality, wastewater treatment biodiversity, and other topics and should be readily translatable to the public or respond to public interest. A recent article on water-related research on the Domain appeared in the online Features magazine:  http://www.sewanee.edu/features/story/water-research.html. Faculty interested in connecting with this work should contact Smith or Turner.
Grant and Research Opportunities for Faculty
The Associated Colleges of the South (ACS), has posted competition information for Cycle II of its grant program, which has three priority areas of Innovative Instruction, Collaborative Curricula, and Diversity and Inclusion. Deadlines of note include July 25 for submitting Sewanee’s Institutional Approval Form, and 5 p.m. CST August 10 for submitting required pre-proposals to the ACS. ACS staff members are available to review “pre-pre-proposals” prior to July 27. Pre-proposals invited to advance to the full proposal stage will have a November 2 submission deadline. Applicants can request planning grant funds to support work between the pre- and full proposal submission stage.
 
The John W. Kluge Center at the Library of Congress invites scholars to conduct research using the vast collections and resources at the Library of Congress. Researchers who have received a terminal advanced degree within the past seven years in the humanities, social sciences or in a professional field such as architecture or law are eligible. Exceptions may be made for individuals without continuous academic careers. Especially encouraged are research projects in the humanities and social sciences, particularly interdisciplinary, cross-cultural, or multilingual projects. Up to 12 Kluge Fellowships are awarded annually, with a monthly stipend of $5,000 for a period of between four and 11 months.  The next deadline for applications is July 15, 2018.
The National Science Foundation’s (NSF) Division of Mathematical Sciences has changed the proposal deadline dates for six of its programs in order to enhance internal efficiencies and reduce the time span between proposal submission and outcome notification. The due dates for the following programs are earlier (between one and 12 weeks) than in previous years: Combinatorics; Computational and Data-Enabled Science and Engineering in Mathematical and Statistical Sciences; Foundations; Mathematical Biology; Probability; and Statistics. The deadline changes are described in NSF 18-065.
 
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