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August 2018 Newsletter
Wildlife & Landscapes

Our forests and grasslands harbor vast biodiversity and mitigate climate change by absorbing carbon from the atmosphere. Despite the enormous value of these ecosystems, we are losing our wildlands at a rapid rate, along with countless species who depend on them.

Currently just 15% of our forests and wildlands around the world are formally protected, and many of these areas are significantly degraded from illegal logging and agriculture conversion.  Through our Wildlife & Landscapes program, LDF is committed to scaling up the true protection of critical eco-regions around the world, connecting often isolated islands of habitat and restoring key areas and threatened wildlife populations. We support efforts on the ground where organizations are working closely with local and indigenous communities and governments to build successful, long-term solutions that both protect natural habitat and improve the lives of the people that live there. 

Wildlife & Landscapes Grantee Spotlight

© Steve Winter / African Parks

Lion Recovery Fund: Lions Return to Malawi's Liwonde National Park

With support from the Lion Recovery Fund and others, conservation nonprofit African Parks has successfully translocated seven wild lions from South Africa to Liwonde National Park in Malawi. These latest translocations are part of the Malawian Government and African Parks' ongoing restoration of Malawi’s natural heritage for the long-term benefit of the people of Malawi. Created by the Wildlife Conservation Network in partnership with LDF, the Lion Recovery Fund aspires to double the number of lions in Africa through strategic investments in critical conservation work on the ground.  Read More >

Wildlife & Landscapes News
Creative Commons: Rob Slaven

Protecting forests is crucial to limiting climate change

With the current climate crisis, we not only need to reduce carbon emissions, but also remove CO2 from the atmosphere if we are to reach the Paris Agreement's goal of limiting warming to 1.5°C. New research from climate scientist Anna Harper shows that in many places, protecting or regenerating forests is more effective in removing atmospheric CO2 than BioEnergy with Carbon Capture and Storage (BECCS), an alternative mitigation strategy that involves producing bioenergy from plants and storing CO2 in bedrock deep underground.   Read more >

Creative Commons: Knut Erik Helle

Connect to protect

Research shows that fragmented habitat leaves nature susceptible to species extinction and the loss of critical ecosystem functions. While protected areas are an established and essential conservation tool, their ability to preserve biodiversity is limited when they are isolated from other habitat patches. In recent years, connectivity conservation - including strategies such as wildlife corridors - is gaining recognition as an opportunity to combat the negative impacts of habitat fragmentation and aid climate adaptation. At present, however, the world lacks a consistent approach to connectivity implementation.   Read More > 

Wildlife & Landscapes Program Book Recommendation
Photo courtesy of Amazon

Reason for Hope by Jane Goodall

Recommended by: Kate Thomas, Program Officer, International Wildlife & Landscape Conservation

Dr. Jane Goodall's revolutionary study of chimpanzees in Tanzania's Gombe preserve forever altered the very definition of humanity. Now, in a poignant and insightful memoir, Jane Goodall explores her extraordinary life and personal spiritual odyssey, with observations as profound as the knowledge she has brought back from the forest. 
 
To see this and other environmentally themed books recommended by the LDF team, visit leonardodicaprio.org/books >

Support LDF in our mission to protect the long-term health and well-being of all Earth’s inhabitants by making a donation today. 
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