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It's almost summer. And all the runners said, "Amen." 
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Heart of the Valley Running News

June 2017

Member Spotlight: Ramon Martinez



This past week, I caught up with Ramon and we chatted over a cup of coffee. If you've never met Ramon, you should. He is equally inspiring and encouraging and it's always a pleasure to talk with him. 

A question that people often get as runners is, "How long have you been doing this?" It may surprise you to know that Ramon hasn't always been a runner. He was a wrestler in high school, but before his senior year, he started running as a way to get into better shape for the upcoming season. He grew up in a small town in California and after graduating from high school, he went on to further his studies at Sacramento State University. He told me that it was his kinesiology professor that signed him up for his first 5K race.
"I did decently at that run, so I decided to see if I could work on getting faster." He joined a few men from the cross-country team at Sacramento State on some of their training runs. "These guys were insanely fast," he said with a chuckle. "I mean...they're running for a Division One school. They were very talented runners. I just told myself that I'm a person that doesn't back down from a challenge." Wanting to push himself further, Ramon went on to transfer to Viterbo University in Wisconsin, where he ran on their cross country team, continuing to challenge himself. 

Today, Ramon uses his passion and talents as a runner not only in local races, but by giving back to the community. In 2015, during his lunch break at Lincoln Elementary School, he went out with his GPS watch and did some measuring around the campus. He then pitched the idea to the school principal to start a kids running club. "I saw it as a great way for kids to get out and run or walk; to let them be free," Ramon said. He was quick to point out that there's no way this could have gotten this project off the ground without the generous help from teachers, parents and volunteers. 

In 2016, the program was registered to become a part of a national organization called the 100 Mile Club. During recess, the kids run laps around a designated course at the school and every time they pass a checkpoint, they scan an electronic card that keeps track of their mileage. "There are medals, certificates, and group celebrations to mark accomplishments. But most importantly, it's something fun they can do every day during recess." In addition to his time spent inspiring runners at Lincoln, Ramon volunteers with the Crescent Valley High School cross country team. 

I asked him what his advice would be for newbie runners.  "Ease into it and don't overwork yourself. Get plugged in with some people from the club. That will make the miles fly by. And don't EVER think you're not fast enough. There will be someone for you to run with. There will be others just like you." 

When asked about what he loves about running, the response came quickly: "I love what running has brought to my life. It brings me a feeling of freedom...and also that sense that I'm totally in control. There's no equipment but my shoes. Also, there have been so many people I've run with that have really impacted me over the years." He also pointed out that running has taken him to some pretty great places. From the Boston Marathon to the mountains of Oregon, he's grateful for the gift that carries him over the miles. 

And if you didn't already know, Ramon just ran the Eugene Marathon in May, placing 19th overall with a time of 2:50:47. That's around 6:30 min/mile for those of you who don't want to do the math. When I asked him how he felt about that and what might be next, he replied, "I'm interested in just seeing how far I can push myself. I haven't hit a wall yet and I don't think I've reached my potential, so I want to explore how far I can go." He's thinking about the California International Marathon in December, a popular marathon for many runners. His goal? To run it faster than the last one. 

Ramon, thanks for being an inspiration to many.
 

Race Report: Lost Creek Trail Run 30K

By Paul Woods 

It was blue sky and puffy clouds in Southern Oregon for the 2017 edition of the Lost Creek Trail Run, a delightful break from the endless rain in the Willamette Valley so far this year. This race is put on by the Southern Oregon Runners and has been going since 2012. The setting is a reservoir on the Rogue River situated about halfway between Medford and Crater Lake. The 30k is the main event. It can be run solo or as a two-person relay. There is also a 5k and, as of two years ago, a 50k option. There were 146 finishers of the 30k, 22 30k relay teams, 108 5k, and 20 50k finishers.

The course is mostly single track that hugs the shoreline, except for a short segment of pavement where Highway 62 crosses the lake, and gravel road on top of the dam. The terrain is fairly flat, at least compared to the Mac -- only 2300 ft gain over 30k. There are several wooden foot bridges, some streams, and a waterfall. Instead of fir and ferns, the flora is typical Southern Oregon: white oak, beautiful manzanita, hearty low bushes and grasses. There was plenty of mud, too, to make a Mac runner feel right at home.

If you want a visual summary of the course, one of the runners had a stabilizing camera and took video along the way. You can check out his YouTube video at https://youtu.be/-B-onEbDdNk. You can even see me a couple of times near the beginning, representin’ in my *short sleeved* blue HOTV shirt. And there is a rainbow unicorn.

My running-buddy-for-the-day was a local runner and principal of an elementary school. He has a great name for the job: Principal Rambo. We ran together for much of the race. At the 10.5 mile point we came to the the main aid station and relay handoff. As I was leaving the station I turned to wait for Principal Rambo. As I turned to take off again, my foot slipped and I went down in the mud-covered rocks, scraping my hand, arm and hip. Nothing like a little blood and mud to make it real.

There were several good aid stations, that were well stocked and attended to by friendly folks. I pulled out a GU as I approached one of them and jokingly asked if there was toast to spread it on. Before I knew it, this cute little kid earnestly handed me a piece of bread. (No. I did not spread Gu on it.)

As for my race, at about 15 miles my calves started cramping. “Oh no,” I thought. “This is about the halfway point for the Mac. I’m dead.” I finished in 2:40:47 which gave me third place for my division, 29th overall.


Run Like a Mother: Two Members. Two Moms. 

If you’ve attended the Thursday night social run, you’ve likely met Monée Johnston, a vibrant young mom of 2 1/2 year old Cohen. She and her husband Chris are expecting a baby girl some time this month. Monee ran through 22 weeks while pregnant with Cohen and ran through much of this pregnancy as well. When running became uncomfortable,she continued to maintain a highly active lifestyle throughout the durations of both pregnancies. She credits her activity level with helping her transition back to running at 7 weeks postpartum, slowly at first, but quickly gaining in strength and speed. Ask her about the mysterious post-baby boost that is purported to give new moms a competitive edge, though, and she shrugs it off as myth. “Running with a stroller gives you stamina”, she laughs. “The reality is that it’s just about finding a community of runners for camaraderie and knowing there’s always a place for you to join in no matter where you’re at.  Lots of moms put running on a high pedestal, but it doesn’t have to be that way.  They say they could never run fast enough or find the time or join a running group, but it’s just not true.  The HOTV community offers lots of paces and people willing to modify their workouts to join you for a run”.  Monée says the trick to getting workouts in with a toddler is to figure out small windows of opportunity to get out – rising early in the morning for Tuesday track or bundling up baby for a stroller run even when the weather is less than ideal.  “Kids can tolerate a lot more than you think,” she says.  “Many of the most picturesque moments happen when I’ve pushed myself to get out despite the weather, and he’s all bundled up with snacks and toys to keep him happy.  In the winter in Oregon, lots of kids never get outside, so at least he’s getting fresh air.” For his part, Cohen seems to be quickly catching his parents’ love of running.  He thrills at going to Thursday Social Runs where he romps with the other toddlers afterward while mom and dad chat with friends and enjoy a drink. He attends his parents’ races, sometimes from the comfort of his stroller and sometimes cheering them on at the finish line in the arms of friends.  Monée says she admires other moms in the club who demonstrate balance – what she defines as drive to reach for their competitive running goals without letting it consume their daily life.  


Kristen Lipscomb is another HOTV mom who is quietly putting in a lot of behind-the-scenes hard work to make her goals come to fruition.  She and her husband Ryan are finding the fine balance of both training for Ironman Canada (July 30) while also working full-time and raising 18-month old Trevor.  Always an active person, Kristen found running after college and it became her go-to activity.  After having Trevor, it was important to her to get back to running, as she finds it keeps her focused and helps her get more done in all areas of her life. Working out also gives her some “me time”, though making time for that is definitely the most challenging aspect as a parent.  Like Monée, Kristen has had to work hard to find windows of time to fit in workouts.  Often that means getting up early before Trevor wakes or going after he’s asleep.  She says early is easier at this point, but sometimes night is simply the only time it can happen. She and Ryan coordinate their busy Ironman training schedules by being relentless about communicating and planning ahead every single day – determining who will work out at what time and who will watch the baby.  
 

Despite her ambitious goals, Kristen cautions against comparing oneself to other people and to past performances.  She emphasizes the importance of making small running goals that are personal rather than pace-based.  New moms deal with many challenges, including sleepless nights and nursing, things that are challenging on their own but are even more to think about when adding in a workout regimen. “Be patient with that”, she advises, noting that she ran the Boston Marathon when Trevor was 7 months old and she allowed herself to just enjoy the experience rather than focusing on how long it would take her.  
 

Kristen has found HOTV to be a fun way to find other moms who are also pushing strollers and running with their kids.  She says stroller running makes for instant connections between parents.  Her best tip for combining parenting and running?  “Have the gear and be ready to use it anytime.  If I have trouble getting him to nap, I put him in the stroller and go for a run and he’s asleep within five minutes!”
 

It’s clear Trevor enjoys running too.  Besides finding the BOB a good place to catch a nap, he has shown an affinity to running around the house at top speed, likely emulating his speedy mom. And with an impending vacation to Whistler this summer to cheer on his mom and dad, who wouldn’t be a fan of the sport?
 

So whether you’re in the weeds of parenting an infant, chasing a toddler or your kids are already besting your 5k PR, there’s definitely a place for you in this hard-working, fun-loving group.  Check out our website for scheduled workout times or reach out to another HOTV member on Facebook to get some camaraderie in this great adventure of parenthood.  

Written by Rachel Prickett, mom to Clara (3) and Jules (2 months)

 
 Nutritionist Rebecca Falihee - Eggplant and Olive 

I approached Rebecca last month to ask her if she would be willing to contribute her recipes and wisdom to the HOTV newsletter on a regular basis. She graciously agreed. Folks, get ready for some kitchen inspiration. Rebecca used to reside in Corvallis, but recently left the land of the Beavers to make her home in Eugene. I guess that's okay. She has a beautiful blog as well as an Instagram account that are both full of healthy recipes that include local ingredients to fuel your body for the long run. I just tried her pesto recipe with some fresh basil and parsley that I had on hand. Do yourself a favor and make it as soon as you can. 

Blog: Eggplant and Olive 

Instagram: @rebecca_fallihee

About Me:
Food and running are two of my biggest interests but food definitely came first, so I’ll start with that! From some of my earliest childhood memories, I was drawn to the kitchen, to experimenting with food. I grew up on a ranch and my mom always had a big garden, and though I was an exceptionally picky eater, I would eat just about any vegetable-based dish. By the time I was in late middle and early high school, I was routinely making dinner for our family and always chose the adventurous and inspired types of recipes, especially for my very meat and potatoes family. At the same time, I gravitated towards an interest in whatever was considered healthy, whether in food or lifestyle, from as far back as I can remember. 

Though I dabbled in running off and on throughout youth on my own, I didn’t pick it up until I first began college. It was a physical outlet to replace all of my former farm chores and also fit into the image of being healthy that I was drawn towards—and I just loved everything about it! While I was beginning to really enjoy running, I was also slowly destroying my relationship to food, as I began to pick up a lot of disordered eating patterns, which eventually turned into a full-blown eating disorder. Learning about the basics of nutrition, being able to continually run and enjoy being in my body, and eventually going “back to my roots” in relearning my relationship to food, through eating what was local and seasonally available, getting to know the farmers producing a lot of the food I was eating, and returning to cooking with whole foods were all tactics that eventually restored and strengthened my relationship to both eating and body image. In the years following, I also found out that I had allergies/intolerances to both gluten and dairy and eliminating them relieved several health symptoms I had experienced my entire life—so I had to rethink and relearn how to eat in a way that was best for me a couple different times!

Probably as result of the time period when I began running, it took a lot of years before I considered myself a runner. It was solely a therapeutic activity at the beginning and it took me several years before I ever ran a race or even ran socially with others. When I ran my first race, I did so without training as a stand-in so as to not leave a friend stranded when her training partner backed out of the Salt Lake City half marathon at the last minute. I found the entire race experience to be exhilarating and I was immediately hooked! 

These days, I am enjoying challenging myself, both in training and races, and am discovering the joy of running more trails in the last couple of years. Professionally, I’ve been working in the general realms of agriculture, food, and nutrition education for the last seven years, but ultimately decided I wanted to deepen my knowledge of nutrition and so am currently back in school as a graduate student in nutrition and integrative health. 

A COUPLE OF SEASONAL RECIPES 

All-the-Greens Interchangeable Pesto

Whenever I have more greens or herbs than I know what to do with, I turn them into pesto and toss the container in the freezer. This recipe is one of my favorites because it is so versatile. I can make it using whatever I have and it provides a lot of flavor to simple and quick meals. Our standard busy day go-to is spaghetti with pesto, but I've swirled it into grain bowls, spooned it atop toasts and pizza crusts, and even thinned it out to make a quick and tasty dressing for green salad. You can use almost any type of herbs and greens including the traditional basil, as well as mint, cilantro, parsley, kale, spinach, radish and turnip tops, etc. Try a few different combinations. My favorites are below!
Though you can either leave out or replace the nutritional yeast with a small amount of parmesan cheese, it is an excellent source of B-vitamins, which we need to convert food into energy, keep stress at bay, alleviate insomnia, fatigue, and mood swings. These are vitamins often depleted when we are stressed and as athletes, we also need them in higher amounts. Additionally, nutritional yeast contains high amounts of protein, is a good source of dietary fiber, folate, and zinc. 

2 cups tightly packed herbs or greens 

1/2 cup nuts or seeds, toasted

2 cloves garlic, roughly chopped

1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil

1/4 cup water

1/2 teaspoon salt

1 tablespoon lemon juice

2 tablespoons nutritional yeast (large flakes) or 2 teaspoons powder

ground black pepper, smoked paprika, or red pepper flakes, to taste

  1. Place the greens, toasted nuts or seeds, and garlic in a food processor. Pulse to combine until the mixture becomes a rough paste.
  2. Turn the motor on and drizzle in the olive oil and water. Add the salt, lemon juice, and nutritional yeast, and pulse a few more times to combine.
  3. Add the optional spices to give it a different flavor spin. 

My favorite combinations:

  • Basil + Pumpkin Seeds
  • Radish Greens + Almonds
  • Mint, Cashews + Green Chile
  • Cilantro + Radish or Turnip Greens, Pumpkin Seeds, Cumin, Coriander, Red Pepper Flakes + Lime

Strawberry Millet Tabbouleh

I am a big fan of combining cooked grains, beans, and whatever seasonal vegetables are on hand to make main-dish style salads that can also double as potluck or celebratory sides. This salad, though a complete deviation from the traditional middle eastern tabbouleh, was a recent favorite in our house. The addition of strawberries really takes it to the next level. 

If you haven’t tried millet, it is a staple grain in many countries around the world, and is similar to couscous in texture and taste. It can be found in the bulk section of most grocery stores. Millet is also rich in magnesium, a nutrient that is often under consumed and necessary for over 300 essential metabolic reactions–including having adequate energy and optimally functioning muscles!


1 cup millet
¾ teaspoon cinnamon
½ teaspoon each cumin and coriander

2 cups water

3-4 green onions

1 pint strawberries

½ a bunch of radishes

2 cups cooked lima beans (or one can, rinsed and drained)

A small handful of mint leaves, finely minced

A slightly larger handful of flat-leaf parsley, finely minced
¼ cup extra virgin olive oil
1-2 tablespoons red wine vinegar
Juice from one small lemon

½ to ¾ teaspoon sea salt and black pepper
¼-½ cup toasted and chopped hazelnuts, as desired

  1. Place the millet in a small saucepan and then add the spices and 2 cups water. Bring to a boil, reduce the heat to low, and then cover. Cook for 15-20 minutes until the water is absorbed, and then set aside to cool slightly. 
  2. Thinly slice the green onions, strawberries, and radishes and add them to a large mixing bowl. Then add the cooked and cooled millet, beans, mint, parsley, oil, vinegar, lemon juice, and salt and pepper. Taste as you go and adjust seasonings as needed. Top with chopped hazelnuts if desired. 
  3. Serve chilled or at room temperature. 

Job Opening: Leader for Intro to Trail Running

HELP WANTED

Assistant Instructor: Beginning Trail Running

HOTV Runners are looking for an Assistant Instructor for their Beginning Trail Running class.  The ideal candidate should be someone who is passionate about trail running and is interested in helping people new to trail running (and sometimes, new to running) learn how to run local trails safely. 

The class is offered by the City of Corvallis and is sponsored by HOTV Runners. 

The work schedule is every Saturday from 9AM to 12PM.

The ideal candidate should:

1) Love trail running and teaching adult learners.

3) Possess a thorough knowledge of local trails (Mac Forest, Peavy Arboretum; Bald Hill; Mulkey trail/Fitton Green; Dunn Forest areas).

4) Have trail racing & training experience.

5) Be willing and able to teach new runners the essentials of trail running: Safety, gear requirements for each season; trail navigation (local trails), nutrition; hill running strategies, injury prevention and recovery, and heart rate monitoring.

6) Be a patient teacher and be willing to abandon pace as a primary consideration.  Be willing to focus on individual fitness levels, heart rate monitoring, hydration, nutrition and strategies for improving each student's performance over the course of the class.

7) Be willing to begin with short distances (e.g., 2 mile run) and be able to complete longer distances over the course of the class (e.g., 8 miles by the last week).

8) Be effective at marketing the class via social media and word of mouth.  Compensation is dependent upon enrollment numbers.

9) Be willing and able to pass a background check (city requirement).  $37.00 fee will be paid by HOTV for chosen candidate.

Max enrollment is 15 persons and the class runs 8 weeks. Since there are students who come back for multiple sessions, tne goal of this recruitment is to be able to offer an intermediate-level course for returning students.  This will require a somewhat faster pace and somewhat longer distances (TBD by students and instructors in the intermediate category).

The chosen person will be co-teaching this course with the current instructor.  As a collaborative effort, you will be encouraged to modify/contribute to the existing syllabi and training routines for this class.

If you are interested in this position, please contact Robert Swan for more information at rswan656@gmail.com.  Please submit a short statement regarding your experience running local area trails and your level of passion for the position. 

There may be a monetary compensation for your time (upon approval by the HOTV Board). Feel free to send any questions you have to Robert. 
 

584.2 miles or: How I Became a Marathoner

By Matt Soicher

I became a "marathoner" on May 7, 2017.  26.2 triumphant (and taxing) miles cruising around Eugene for 4+ hours.  It started as a nebulous goal years ago; one of those, "Man, that would be cool to do some day" kinda things.  That was way before I realized the planning and dedication required.  Slowly but surely, I watched (or listened to stories) as friend after friend (mostly HOTV runners) seemed to block off their calendar with run after run - for months - before taking on the daunting marathon.  I learned that most people don't just get marathon-ready overnight, or with general, "every so often" running.  No, as a first-timer, I needed a strict training plan to prepare me.  In fact, one of the main reasons I had always been hesitant to sign up for a marathon was the ridiculous time commitment and the assumed loneliness that came along with it.  I didn't want to be missing out on fun times with friends.  I didn't want to have to turn down that Friday night invitation or leave a friend's house early on Saturday night just to be ready to wake up early...and run.  So, I had all but decided that a half-marathon would be my longest race.

Then, a funny thing happened.  My friend Sarah signed up for a marathon, trained for it, and ran it; and I barely noticed.  At first, I felt like a bad friend for not supporting her more; but then I had an epiphany.  She was still around most Friday nights or weekend afternoons, ready to grab dinner or go wine tasting or whatever else our friend-group was doing.  I remember asking her how she did it and she told me she had two simple goals for her marathon training: 1) Get through it without getting injured; and 2) Don't let it consume her life so much that she dreaded running.  The key was to survive it, enjoy the sense of personal accomplishment, and not hate running too much after it was over.  It was then that I thought maybe I could pull it off.  Maybe I could not only run a marathon, but fit the training into my "regular life", tweak my daily schedule enough - without a complete overhaul - to fit in all the morning runs and hours of training without giving up everything else I enjoyed. 

I found a training plan that seemed doable: Hal Higdon's Intermediate Marathon Training Program (available for free!).  My training plan called for running 5-days a week for 18 weeks - only 90 runs between me and a marathon (full disclosure: I ended up missing 3 runs - all due to travel - but otherwise I was consistent and disciplined).  As I started my journey, I worried about a lot of things.  I worried it would be difficult (it was).  I worried it would take over my life (it sorta did, but not in a bad way).  And I worried it would be lonely (it was not).  In fact, what I found was a palpable sense of support from my wife and my friends.  I can still remember how excited my friends were for me when I told them I had registered for the Eugene Marathon.  And that was only the beginning.  Before long, I had talked my buddy Chris into signing up and training with me.  As time wore on, the miles added up.  I ran in the dark; I ran in the rain; I ran in the cold; I ran in the snow; I ran through hail; I ran on ice; I even ran in 4 different states.  But one thing I didn't have to do was run alone.  In fact, over the course of 4.5 months of training, I only had to run alone 15 times (or 9, if you count my dog MacKenzie).  I had nearly 500 miles of company!

I started asking friends to join me on weekend long runs.  Before long I had a full-on weekly email chain going out to 10-12 people.  Friends started to shuffle in and out as the weekend runs got longer.  Soon enough I settled into a nice little routine.  I didn't even have to say anything anymore.  My wife, Raechel, knew I'd be home late for dinner after track on Tuesdays.  Katie (and MacKenzie) knew our 6:10am Wednesday morning meeting spot on the Midge Cramer Path by heart.  And the Chrises were ready (nearly) every Saturday and Sunday to run - fast or slow - no matter how early we had to get up or how late we had stayed up the night before.  And that was the glorious part.  I wanted to do the hardest (physical) thing I'd ever done to show myself I could.  And my one caveat was that I didn't want to sacrifice the other things in my life that made me happy.  Sure, there may have been the occasional uncomfortable compromise: run while on vacation in Hawaii?  Gotta do it!  Run in hot and humid south Florida?  Yep!  Run around Atlanta twice on a short weekend trip to visit a friend?  Done.  18-miler after staying up past 2 am for a German-themed going away party?  Wouldn't miss it!  Looking back, marathon training was a glorious and humbling experience.  It was fun and challenging and tiring and motivating and every other adjective I hoped it would be.  On the day of the race, many of the friends that had been my unofficial training partners got up early and drive down to Eugene, signs in hand, and cheered me on all over the course.  With their help, I crossed that finish line with a smile on my face, despite the pain in my legs.  Even though running a marathon is a personal and individual feat, I felt like my friends and I had somehow accomplished something together, and I'll never forget it.  Thanks, everyone.

 

Member Spotlight: Ramon Martinez



This past week, I caught up with Ramon and we chatted over a cup of coffee. If you've never met Ramon, you should. He is equally inspiring and encouraging and it's always a pleasure to talk with him. 

A question that people often get as runners is, "How long have you been doing this?" It may surprise you to know that Ramon hasn't always been a runner. He was a wrestler in high school, but before his senior year, he started running as a way to get into better shape for the upcoming season. He grew up in a small town in California and after graduating from high school, he went on to further his studies at Sacramento State University. He told me that it was his kinesiology professor that signed him up for his first 5K race.
"I did decently at that run, so I decided to see if I could work on getting faster." He joined a few men from the cross-country team at Sacramento State on some of their training runs. "These guys were insanely fast," he said with a chuckle. "I mean...they're running for a Division One school. They were very talented runners. I just told myself that I'm a person that doesn't back down from a challenge." Wanting to push himself further, Ramon went on to transfer to Viterbo University in Wisconsin, where he ran on their cross country team, continuing to challenge himself. 

Today, Ramon uses his passion and talents as a runner not only in local races, but by giving back to the community. In 2015, during his lunch break at Lincoln Elementary School, he went out with his GPS watch and did some measuring around the campus. He then pitched the idea to the school principal to start a kids running club. "I saw it as a great way for kids to get out and run or walk; to let them be free," Ramon said. He was quick to point out that there's no way this could have gotten this project off the ground without the generous help from teachers, parents and volunteers. 

In 2016, the program was registered to become a part of a national organization called the 100 Mile Club. During recess, the kids run laps around a designated course at the school and every time they pass a checkpoint, they scan an electronic card that keeps track of their mileage. "There are medals, certificates, and group celebrations to mark accomplishments. But most importantly, it's something fun they can do every day during recess." In addition to his time spent inspiring runners at Lincoln, Ramon volunteers with the Crescent Valley High School cross country team. 

I asked him what his advice would be for newbie runners.  "Ease into it and don't overwork yourself. Get plugged in with some people from the club. That will make the miles fly by. And don't EVER think you're not fast enough. There will be someone for you to run with. There will be others just like you." 

When asked about what he loves about running, the response came quickly: "I love what running has brought to my life. It brings me a feeling of freedom...and also that sense that I'm totally in control. There's no equipment but my shoes. Also, there have been so many people I've run with that have really impacted me over the years." He also pointed out that running has taken him to some pretty great places. From the Boston Marathon to the mountains of Oregon, he's grateful for the gift that carries him over the miles. 

And if you didn't already know, Ramon just ran the Eugene Marathon in May, placing 19th overall with a time of 2:50:47. That's around 6:30 min/mile for those of you who don't want to do the math. When I asked him how he felt about that and what might be next, he replied, "I'm interested in just seeing how far I can push myself. I haven't hit a wall yet and I don't think I've reached my potential, so I want to explore how far I can go." He's thinking about the California International Marathon in December, a popular marathon for many runners. His goal? To run it faster than the last one. 

Ramon, thanks for being an inspiration to many.
 

Race Report: Lost Creek Trail Run 30K

By Paul Woods 

It was blue sky and puffy clouds in Southern Oregon for the 2017 edition of the Lost Creek Trail Run, a delightful break from the endless rain in the Willamette Valley so far this year. This race is put on by the Southern Oregon Runners and has been going since 2012. The setting is a reservoir on the Rogue River situated about halfway between Medford and Crater Lake. The 30k is the main event. It can be run solo or as a two-person relay. There is also a 5k and, as of two years ago, a 50k option. There were 146 finishers of the 30k, 22 30k relay teams, 108 5k, and 20 50k finishers.

The course is mostly single track that hugs the shoreline, except for a short segment of pavement where Highway 62 crosses the lake, and gravel road on top of the dam. The terrain is fairly flat, at least compared to the Mac -- only 2300 ft gain over 30k. There are several wooden foot bridges, some streams, and a waterfall. Instead of fir and ferns, the flora is typical Southern Oregon: white oak, beautiful manzanita, hearty low bushes and grasses. There was plenty of mud, too, to make a Mac runner feel right at home.

If you want a visual summary of the course, one of the runners had a stabilizing camera and took video along the way. You can check out his YouTube video at https://youtu.be/-B-onEbDdNk. You can even see me a couple of times near the beginning, representin’ in my *short sleeved* blue HOTV shirt. And there is a rainbow unicorn.

My running-buddy-for-the-day was a local runner and principal of an elementary school. He has a great name for the job: Principal Rambo. We ran together for much of the race. At the 10.5 mile point we came to the the main aid station and relay handoff. As I was leaving the station I turned to wait for Principal Rambo. As I turned to take off again, my foot slipped and I went down in the mud-covered rocks, scraping my hand, arm and hip. Nothing like a little blood and mud to make it real.

There were several good aid stations, that were well stocked and attended to by friendly folks. I pulled out a GU as I approached one of them and jokingly asked if there was toast to spread it on. Before I knew it, this cute little kid earnestly handed me a piece of bread. (No. I did not spread Gu on it.)

As for my race, at about 15 miles my calves started cramping. “Oh no,” I thought. “This is about the halfway point for the Mac. I’m dead.” I finished in 2:40:47 which gave me third place for my division, 29th overall.


Run Like a Mother: Two Members. Two Moms. 

If you’ve attended the Thursday night social run, you’ve likely met Monée Johnston, a vibrant young mom of 2 1/2 year old Cohen. She and her husband Chris are expecting a baby girl some time this month. Monee ran through 22 weeks while pregnant with Cohen and ran through much of this pregnancy as well. When running became uncomfortable,she continued to maintain a highly active lifestyle throughout the durations of both pregnancies. She credits her activity level with helping her transition back to running at 7 weeks postpartum, slowly at first, but quickly gaining in strength and speed. Ask her about the mysterious post-baby boost that is purported to give new moms a competitive edge, though, and she shrugs it off as myth. “Running with a stroller gives you stamina”, she laughs. “The reality is that it’s just about finding a community of runners for camaraderie and knowing there’s always a place for you to join in no matter where you’re at.  Lots of moms put running on a high pedestal, but it doesn’t have to be that way.  They say they could never run fast enough or find the time or join a running group, but it’s just not true.  The HOTV community offers lots of paces and people willing to modify their workouts to join you for a run”.  Monée says the trick to getting workouts in with a toddler is to figure out small windows of opportunity to get out – rising early in the morning for Tuesday track or bundling up baby for a stroller run even when the weather is less than ideal.  “Kids can tolerate a lot more than you think,” she says.  “Many of the most picturesque moments happen when I’ve pushed myself to get out despite the weather, and he’s all bundled up with snacks and toys to keep him happy.  In the winter in Oregon, lots of kids never get outside, so at least he’s getting fresh air.” For his part, Cohen seems to be quickly catching his parents’ love of running.  He thrills at going to Thursday Social Runs where he romps with the other toddlers afterward while mom and dad chat with friends and enjoy a drink. He attends his parents’ races, sometimes from the comfort of his stroller and sometimes cheering them on at the finish line in the arms of friends.  Monée says she admires other moms in the club who demonstrate balance – what she defines as drive to reach for their competitive running goals without letting it consume their daily life.  


Kristen Lipscomb is another HOTV mom who is quietly putting in a lot of behind-the-scenes hard work to make her goals come to fruition.  She and her husband Ryan are finding the fine balance of both training for Ironman Canada (July 30) while also working full-time and raising 18-month old Trevor.  Always an active person, Kristen found running after college and it became her go-to activity.  After having Trevor, it was important to her to get back to running, as she finds it keeps her focused and helps her get more done in all areas of her life. Working out also gives her some “me time”, though making time for that is definitely the most challenging aspect as a parent.  Like Monée, Kristen has had to work hard to find windows of time to fit in workouts.  Often that means getting up early before Trevor wakes or going after he’s asleep.  She says early is easier at this point, but sometimes night is simply the only time it can happen. She and Ryan coordinate their busy Ironman training schedules by being relentless about communicating and planning ahead every single day – determining who will work out at what time and who will watch the baby.  
 

Despite her ambitious goals, Kristen cautions against comparing oneself to other people and to past performances.  She emphasizes the importance of making small running goals that are personal rather than pace-based.  New moms deal with many challenges, including sleepless nights and nursing, things that are challenging on their own but are even more to think about when adding in a workout regimen. “Be patient with that”, she advises, noting that she ran the Boston Marathon when Trevor was 7 months old and she allowed herself to just enjoy the experience rather than focusing on how long it would take her.  
 

Kristen has found HOTV to be a fun way to find other moms who are also pushing strollers and running with their kids.  She says stroller running makes for instant connections between parents.  Her best tip for combining parenting and running?  “Have the gear and be ready to use it anytime.  If I have trouble getting him to nap, I put him in the stroller and go for a run and he’s asleep within five minutes!”
 

It’s clear Trevor enjoys running too.  Besides finding the BOB a good place to catch a nap, he has shown an affinity to running around the house at top speed, likely emulating his speedy mom. And with an impending vacation to Whistler this summer to cheer on his mom and dad, who wouldn’t be a fan of the sport?
 

So whether you’re in the weeds of parenting an infant, chasing a toddler or your kids are already besting your 5k PR, there’s definitely a place for you in this hard-working, fun-loving group.  Check out our website for scheduled workout times or reach out to another HOTV member on Facebook to get some camaraderie in this great adventure of parenthood.  

Written by Rachel Prickett, mom to Clara (3) and Jules (2 months)

 
 Nutritionist Rebecca Falihee - Eggplant and Olive 

I approached Rebecca last month to ask her if she would be willing to contribute her recipes and wisdom to the HOTV newsletter on a regular basis. She graciously agreed. Folks, get ready for some kitchen inspiration. Rebecca used to reside in Corvallis, but recently left the land of the Beavers to make her home in Eugene. I guess that's okay. She has a beautiful blog as well as an Instagram account that are both full of healthy recipes that include local ingredients to fuel your body for the long run. I just tried her pesto recipe with some fresh basil and parsley that I had on hand. Do yourself a favor and make it as soon as you can. 

Blog: Eggplant and Olive 

Instagram: @rebecca_fallihee

About Me:
Food and running are two of my biggest interests but food definitely came first, so I’ll start with that! From some of my earliest childhood memories, I was drawn to the kitchen, to experimenting with food. I grew up on a ranch and my mom always had a big garden, and though I was an exceptionally picky eater, I would eat just about any vegetable-based dish. By the time I was in late middle and early high school, I was routinely making dinner for our family and always chose the adventurous and inspired types of recipes, especially for my very meat and potatoes family. At the same time, I gravitated towards an interest in whatever was considered healthy, whether in food or lifestyle, from as far back as I can remember. 

Though I dabbled in running off and on throughout youth on my own, I didn’t pick it up until I first began college. It was a physical outlet to replace all of my former farm chores and also fit into the image of being healthy that I was drawn towards—and I just loved everything about it! While I was beginning to really enjoy running, I was also slowly destroying my relationship to food, as I began to pick up a lot of disordered eating patterns, which eventually turned into a full-blown eating disorder. Learning about the basics of nutrition, being able to continually run and enjoy being in my body, and eventually going “back to my roots” in relearning my relationship to food, through eating what was local and seasonally available, getting to know the farmers producing a lot of the food I was eating, and returning to cooking with whole foods were all tactics that eventually restored and strengthened my relationship to both eating and body image. In the years following, I also found out that I had allergies/intolerances to both gluten and dairy and eliminating them relieved several health symptoms I had experienced my entire life—so I had to rethink and relearn how to eat in a way that was best for me a couple different times!

Probably as result of the time period when I began running, it took a lot of years before I considered myself a runner. It was solely a therapeutic activity at the beginning and it took me several years before I ever ran a race or even ran socially with others. When I ran my first race, I did so without training as a stand-in so as to not leave a friend stranded when her training partner backed out of the Salt Lake City half marathon at the last minute. I found the entire race experience to be exhilarating and I was immediately hooked! 

These days, I am enjoying challenging myself, both in training and races, and am discovering the joy of running more trails in the last couple of years. Professionally, I’ve been working in the general realms of agriculture, food, and nutrition education for the last seven years, but ultimately decided I wanted to deepen my knowledge of nutrition and so am currently back in school as a graduate student in nutrition and integrative health. 

A COUPLE OF SEASONAL RECIPES 

All-the-Greens Interchangeable Pesto

Whenever I have more greens or herbs than I know what to do with, I turn them into pesto and toss the container in the freezer. This recipe is one of my favorites because it is so versatile. I can make it using whatever I have and it provides a lot of flavor to simple and quick meals. Our standard busy day go-to is spaghetti with pesto, but I've swirled it into grain bowls, spooned it atop toasts and pizza crusts, and even thinned it out to make a quick and tasty dressing for green salad. You can use almost any type of herbs and greens including the traditional basil, as well as mint, cilantro, parsley, kale, spinach, radish and turnip tops, etc. Try a few different combinations. My favorites are below!
Though you can either leave out or replace the nutritional yeast with a small amount of parmesan cheese, it is an excellent source of B-vitamins, which we need to convert food into energy, keep stress at bay, alleviate insomnia, fatigue, and mood swings. These are vitamins often depleted when we are stressed and as athletes, we also need them in higher amounts. Additionally, nutritional yeast contains high amounts of protein, is a good source of dietary fiber, folate, and zinc. 

2 cups tightly packed herbs or greens 

1/2 cup nuts or seeds, toasted

2 cloves garlic, roughly chopped

1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil

1/4 cup water

1/2 teaspoon salt

1 tablespoon lemon juice

2 tablespoons nutritional yeast (large flakes) or 2 teaspoons powder

ground black pepper, smoked paprika, or red pepper flakes, to taste

  1. Place the greens, toasted nuts or seeds, and garlic in a food processor. Pulse to combine until the mixture becomes a rough paste.
  2. Turn the motor on and drizzle in the olive oil and water. Add the salt, lemon juice, and nutritional yeast, and pulse a few more times to combine.
  3. Add the optional spices to give it a different flavor spin. 

My favorite combinations:

  • Basil + Pumpkin Seeds
  • Radish Greens + Almonds
  • Mint, Cashews + Green Chile
  • Cilantro + Radish or Turnip Greens, Pumpkin Seeds, Cumin, Coriander, Red Pepper Flakes + Lime

Strawberry Millet Tabbouleh

I am a big fan of combining cooked grains, beans, and whatever seasonal vegetables are on hand to make main-dish style salads that can also double as potluck or celebratory sides. This salad, though a complete deviation from the traditional middle eastern tabbouleh, was a recent favorite in our house. The addition of strawberries really takes it to the next level. 

If you haven’t tried millet, it is a staple grain in many countries around the world, and is similar to couscous in texture and taste. It can be found in the bulk section of most grocery stores. Millet is also rich in magnesium, a nutrient that is often under consumed and necessary for over 300 essential metabolic reactions–including having adequate energy and optimally functioning muscles!


1 cup millet
¾ teaspoon cinnamon
½ teaspoon each cumin and coriander

2 cups water

3-4 green onions

1 pint strawberries

½ a bunch of radishes

2 cups cooked lima beans (or one can, rinsed and drained)

A small handful of mint leaves, finely minced

A slightly larger handful of flat-leaf parsley, finely minced
¼ cup extra virgin olive oil
1-2 tablespoons red wine vinegar
Juice from one small lemon

½ to ¾ teaspoon sea salt and black pepper
¼-½ cup toasted and chopped hazelnuts, as desired

  1. Place the millet in a small saucepan and then add the spices and 2 cups water. Bring to a boil, reduce the heat to low, and then cover. Cook for 15-20 minutes until the water is absorbed, and then set aside to cool slightly. 
  2. Thinly slice the green onions, strawberries, and radishes and add them to a large mixing bowl. Then add the cooked and cooled millet, beans, mint, parsley, oil, vinegar, lemon juice, and salt and pepper. Taste as you go and adjust seasonings as needed. Top with chopped hazelnuts if desired. 
  3. Serve chilled or at room temperature. 

Job Opening: Leader for Intro to Trail Running

HELP WANTED

Assistant Instructor: Beginning Trail Running

HOTV Runners are looking for an Assistant Instructor for their Beginning Trail Running class.  The ideal candidate should be someone who is passionate about trail running and is interested in helping people new to trail running (and sometimes, new to running) learn how to run local trails safely. 

The class is offered by the City of Corvallis and is sponsored by HOTV Runners. 

The work schedule is every Saturday from 9AM to 12PM.

The ideal candidate should:

1) Love trail running and teaching adult learners.

3) Possess a thorough knowledge of local trails (Mac Forest, Peavy Arboretum; Bald Hill; Mulkey trail/Fitton Green; Dunn Forest areas).

4) Have trail racing & training experience.

5) Be willing and able to teach new runners the essentials of trail running: Safety, gear requirements for each season; trail navigation (local trails), nutrition; hill running strategies, injury prevention and recovery, and heart rate monitoring.

6) Be a patient teacher and be willing to abandon pace as a primary consideration.  Be willing to focus on individual fitness levels, heart rate monitoring, hydration, nutrition and strategies for improving each student's performance over the course of the class.

7) Be willing to begin with short distances (e.g., 2 mile run) and be able to complete longer distances over the course of the class (e.g., 8 miles by the last week).

8) Be effective at marketing the class via social media and word of mouth.  Compensation is dependent upon enrollment numbers.

9) Be willing and able to pass a background check (city requirement).  $37.00 fee will be paid by HOTV for chosen candidate.

Max enrollment is 15 persons and the class runs 8 weeks. Since there are students who come back for multiple sessions, tne goal of this recruitment is to be able to offer an intermediate-level course for returning students.  This will require a somewhat faster pace and somewhat longer distances (TBD by students and instructors in the intermediate category).

The chosen person will be co-teaching this course with the current instructor.  As a collaborative effort, you will be encouraged to modify/contribute to the existing syllabi and training routines for this class.

If you are interested in this position, please contact Robert Swan for more information at rswan656@gmail.com.  Please submit a short statement regarding your experience running local area trails and your level of passion for the position. 

There may be a monetary compensation for your time (upon approval by the HOTV Board). Feel free to send any questions you have to Robert. 
 

584.2 miles or: How I Became a Marathoner

By Matt Soicher

I became a "marathoner" on May 7, 2017.  26.2 triumphant (and taxing) miles cruising around Eugene for 4+ hours.  It started as a nebulous goal years ago; one of those, "Man, that would be cool to do some day" kinda things.  That was way before I realized the planning and dedication required.  Slowly but surely, I watched (or listened to stories) as friend after friend (mostly HOTV runners) seemed to block off their calendar with run after run - for months - before taking on the daunting marathon.  I learned that most people don't just get marathon-ready overnight, or with general, "every so often" running.  No, as a first-timer, I needed a strict training plan to prepare me.  In fact, one of the main reasons I had always been hesitant to sign up for a marathon was the ridiculous time commitment and the assumed loneliness that came along with it.  I didn't want to be missing out on fun times with friends.  I didn't want to have to turn down that Friday night invitation or leave a friend's house early on Saturday night just to be ready to wake up early...and run.  So, I had all but decided that a half-marathon would be my longest race.

Then, a funny thing happened.  My friend Sarah signed up for a marathon, trained for it, and ran it; and I barely noticed.  At first, I felt like a bad friend for not supporting her more; but then I had an epiphany.  She was still around most Friday nights or weekend afternoons, ready to grab dinner or go wine tasting or whatever else our friend-group was doing.  I remember asking her how she did it and she told me she had two simple goals for her marathon training: 1) Get through it without getting injured; and 2) Don't let it consume her life so much that she dreaded running.  The key was to survive it, enjoy the sense of personal accomplishment, and not hate running too much after it was over.  It was then that I thought maybe I could pull it off.  Maybe I could not only run a marathon, but fit the training into my "regular life", tweak my daily schedule enough - without a complete overhaul - to fit in all the morning runs and hours of training without giving up everything else I enjoyed. 

I found a training plan that seemed doable: Hal Higdon's Intermediate Marathon Training Program (available for free!).  My training plan called for running 5-days a week for 18 weeks - only 90 runs between me and a marathon (full disclosure: I ended up missing 3 runs - all due to travel - but otherwise I was consistent and disciplined).  As I started my journey, I worried about a lot of things.  I worried it would be difficult (it was).  I worried it would take over my life (it sorta did, but not in a bad way).  And I worried it would be lonely (it was not).  In fact, what I found was a palpable sense of support from my wife and my friends.  I can still remember how excited my friends were for me when I told them I had registered for the Eugene Marathon.  And that was only the beginning.  Before long, I had talked my buddy Chris into signing up and training with me.  As time wore on, the miles added up.  I ran in the dark; I ran in the rain; I ran in the cold; I ran in the snow; I ran through hail; I ran on ice; I even ran in 4 different states.  But one thing I didn't have to do was run alone.  In fact, over the course of 4.5 months of training, I only had to run alone 15 times (or 9, if you count my dog MacKenzie).  I had nearly 500 miles of company!

I started asking friends to join me on weekend long runs.  Before long I had a full-on weekly email chain going out to 10-12 people.  Friends started to shuffle in and out as the weekend runs got longer.  Soon enough I settled into a nice little routine.  I didn't even have to say anything anymore.  My wife, Raechel, knew I'd be home late for dinner after track on Tuesdays.  Katie (and MacKenzie) knew our 6:10am Wednesday morning meeting spot on the Midge Cramer Path by heart.  And the Chrises were ready (nearly) every Saturday and Sunday to run - fast or slow - no matter how early we had to get up or how late we had stayed up the night before.  And that was the glorious part.  I wanted to do the hardest (physical) thing I'd ever done to show myself I could.  And my one caveat was that I didn't want to sacrifice the other things in my life that made me happy.  Sure, there may have been the occasional uncomfortable compromise: run while on vacation in Hawaii?  Gotta do it!  Run in hot and humid south Florida?  Yep!  Run around Atlanta twice on a short weekend trip to visit a friend?  Done.  18-miler after staying up past 2 am for a German-themed going away party?  Wouldn't miss it!  Looking back, marathon training was a glorious and humbling experience.  It was fun and challenging and tiring and motivating and every other adjective I hoped it would be.  On the day of the race, many of the friends that had been my unofficial training partners got up early and drive down to Eugene, signs in hand, and cheered me on all over the course.  With their help, I crossed that finish line with a smile on my face, despite the pain in my legs.  Even though running a marathon is a personal and individual feat, I felt like my friends and I had somehow accomplished something together, and I'll never forget it.  Thanks, everyone.


 

UPCOMING EVENTS

June 4  - Give Us 5 Run/Walk 5k 
Celebrating Cancer Survivorship

Interested?  More information HERE

 
 
June 10 -- 11th Annual Run for the Hills 30k Trail Run, 
8k Trail Run/2mi Walk & 1/4 kids run

Benefiting the Greenbelt Land Trust Trail Fund
Run for the Hills 

June 17--Mary's Peak 50 Mile/50K/25K Trail Run.
Mary's Peak Trail Run.

Register HERE   

June 24—Running Wild 5K Trap Shooting, Archery, Casting Family Fun Run/Walk
A 5K with a wild side. 
E.E. Wilson Wildlife Area, 29555 Camp Adair Road, Monmouth, OR 97361
Team Running Wild

 

 

 

 
Our email address is: 
hotvrunners@gmail.com

Have an idea for the newsletter? A race report? Recipes? Jokes? Feel free to email us. We are welcome to any and all ideas. 

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JOIN US FOR A RUN 

Check out on of the many social run or workouts put on by HOTV club members. 

Monday

6pm
"Motivation Monday" or "Recovery Run Monday"
Meet at the Fairgrounds entrance to the Midge Cramer Path. (map)
Group run. All paces welcome. Distance varies but typically we run for an hour or so. 4-8miles depending on group's interests. Some paved path. Some trail. Some hills. Once the weather turns a bit wet we stay to the paved path (mostly).
Always keep an eye on the Facebook group for day of announcements. While this workout does have some regulars, it doesn't have a main contact person.

Tuesday

5:30 – 6:45am
"Track Tuesday" (early bird)
Meet at Corvallis High School track (map)

6pm
"Track Tuesday" (night owl)
Meet at Corvallis High School track (map)
All paces welcome.
Warm ups. Various speed workouts. And a totally optional but totally worth it (kinda) post run workout. Abs by Abby. 
Check Facebook group for day of posts. Sometimes location changes due to high school activities. Contact is Matt Soicher.

Wednesday

¯\_(ツ)_/¯

Thursday

5:45 – 7am
"Group run"
Meet at SW 53rd and SW Reservoir Road (Fairground Parking Lot)
Paces usually 9:15/mile and up. All are welcome.
​Check Facebook group for posts the evening before, for general variations in planned route.

6pm
"Social run"
Meet at Five Star Sports. (map)
Social run, 3-6 miles. All abilities welcome! Nobody runs alone. Join us for a beer and food after the run.
Check Facebook group for day-of posts of which route we will run and where we are meeting afterwards. 

Friday

¯\_(ツ)_/¯

Saturday

8am
"Find your happy pace"
Meet at Running Princess, 351 SW Madison Ave. (map)
All walkers and runners are invited to join us for a fun out-and-back course along the river and past Avery park on the paved path. Dogs, strollers, everyone welcome!
Choose your pace, choose your distance. We'll all start together. Finish up and visit the bustling Saturday Farmers Market.
(Facebook event page)

There are also various group runs that happen on Saturday mornings. Some are on trails. Some are around town. Once again, check the Facebook page for opportunities to meet with friends or find some new running pals. 

Sunday

¯\_(ツ)_/¯
how about a trail run?
Want some company on a Sunday run?
Check out the HOTV Facebook group for possible runs posted by HOTV members. Want to go for a run? Post on the Facebook page and you might find some company. 

 

Interested in Getting Involved? Contact hotvrunners@gmail.com with a description or your idea for the club!


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HOTV Running Club · 3358 NW Taylor · Corvallis, OR 97330 · USA

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