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UC Santa Barbara

North Campus Open Space Restoration Project

  March 2019
Aerial photo looking north over Devereux Slough and NCOS on January 20 - note the waves and high tide flowing into the slough mouth at the left side of the photo.
Aerial photo looking north over Devereux Slough and NCOS on January 20 - note the waves and high tide flowing into the slough mouth at the left side of the photo. 

UPDATES & EVENTS
NCOS User Survey 
More than 170 people have taken the NCOS user survey that was sent out with last month's newsletter. There is still time to anonymously share your thoughts, feelings and ideas about the project by completing the survey. Your input means a lot to us and will help guide our planning. Thank you!

Tidal Flows Enrich Habitat on NCOS
Much of the wrack along the shoreline of NCOS has been brought in from the ocean during the king tides this past month. These tides bring a pulse of nutrients and organic matter into the upper estuary, providing hiding places and food opportunities for foraging shorebirds.
Wrack comprised of driftwood, kelp and other pieces of dead vegetation now line the shores of NCOS thanks to the recent king tides.
Wrack comprised of driftwood, kelp and other pieces of dead vegetation now line the shores of NCOS thanks to the recent king tides.

Trail Substrate
We recognize that portions of the trail are loose and sharp. While another trail substrate known as DG (decomposed granite) is "softer" on the foot, it is also so soft that rain easily forms puddles in depressions, and bikes and vehicles leave ruts and ridges that harden and can create hazards for cyclists, runners and walkers (see photo below). The NCOS Marsh trail is constructed of class II road base, which is mixed sizes of gravel and fines. 95% of the trail has been accessible through all the rainy weather we’ve been having, and the trail is compacting well where it gets a lot of use. We are continuing to work towards compacting the less used and looser areas, and trying to crush the larger gravel with a long-term vision of a comfortable, all-season trail. Support for the long-term maintenance of the trail is needed to complete this work.
The flooded and rutted DG (decomposed granite) trail at West Campus Bluffs.
The flooded and rutted DG (decomposed granite) trail at West Campus Bluffs.

Community members walking along a section of the NCOS Marsh trail.
Community members walking along a section of the NCOS Marsh trail.

As Spring Arrives, so does the Breeding Season
Birds and wildlife are moving from winter mode into springtime breeding mode, which means many birds will be making their way north to their traditional breeding habitats - species of ducks, geese, many shorebirds, and even the Burrowing Owls. The song sparrows, phoebes, and herons should stick around. We will be watching closely for breeding and nesting on NCOS, especially by special status species such as the Western Snowy Plover and Belding’s Savannah Sparrow.
Geese flying in formation over NCOS.
Geese flying in formation over NCOS.
FEATURE STORY

Spring Planting and Weeding Plans at NCOS


Spring is on our doorstep, and with the NCOS restoration project well into its second year, we're taking stock of the planting progress and plans for the coming months. Read more about how we're working to control invasive weeds in order to give native plants an opportunity to establish.

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES

"Second Saturdays" at NCOS

This month: March 9,  9:30 - 12:00
Upcoming dates: April 13

Help us restore and create NCOS with plants and more! Meet at 6975 Whittier Drive at 9:30 am. Bring water, sunscreen, and wear a hat, clothes and shoes suitable for garden work. Please RSVP to ncos@ccber.ucsb.edu

Saturday Tree Plantings


March 9 (this Saturday!)

You can help Your Children's Trees plant oaks and other saplings at NCOS! Please contact Your Children's Trees for more information and to RSVP.

Thursdays - CCBER Greenhouse Associates



Come help transplant seedlings of native plants with the CCBER team from 9:00 - 12:00. To join, please send an email to ncos@ccber.ucsb.edu.

Group Volunteer Opportunities 


We gladly welcome local business, non-profit, school and other community groups to come out to NCOS to help with planting and other activities. For more information, please send an email to ncos@ccber.ucsb.edu.

PHOTOS & VIDEO
Spring is in the air! The NCOS Marsh Trail is becoming more colorful as plants begin to flower and birds are displaying breeding plumage. 

A small, inconspicuous flower cluster of California Saltbush (Extriplex californica). 

Contrary to its name, Blue-eyed grass (Sisyrinchium bellum) has purple flowers and is a member of the Iris family (Iridacae). 

A pair of migrating hooded mergansers stop off in Whittier Pond on their way to breeding grounds

Bonus photo: a loggerhead shrike scanning for prey from a fence. Photo by Mark Bright. 

Have a plant, wildlife, or other photo of NCOS you'd like to share? We welcome submissions of photos of the project site and/or the adjacent Ellwood-Devereux area to share with NCOS News readers. Please email a photo you would like to share along with a brief description to ncos@ccber.ucsb.edu.

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North Campus Open Space Restoration Project, Click here, or email 
ncos@ccber.ucsb.edu
Copyright © 2019 Cheadle Center for Biodiversity and Ecological Restoration (CCBER), All rights reserved.





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Cheadle Center for Biodiversity and Ecological Restoration (CCBER) · Bldg 578 Harder South · UCSB, MC 9615 · Santa Barbara, CA 93106 · USA

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