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Hello <<First Name>> and welcome to Issue #46 of the Materials for Architecture Newsletter, published Friday 1st June 2018
Hello <<First Name>> and welcome to Issue #46 of the Materials for Architecture Newsletter, published Friday 1st June 2018
In this issue, we bring you news on a curtain of hollow bricks, recyclable cardboard tents, plus more on 3D printed materials, composites & plastics, concrete & aggregates, metals and timber.
Have a story relevant to materials in construction and architecture that you'd like to share? 
Send it through to news@materialsforarchitecture.com for consideration. Find out more about the event, Materials for Architecture, at www.materialsforarchitecture.com
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3D PRINTED MATERIALS
3D printed molds are created to restore historic architecture
EDG, a New York architecture and engineering firm has come up with a cost-effective way to bridge technology and craft: Modern Ornamental: a new form of digital sculpture. The key lies in 3D printing. In developing modern ornamental, laser 3D scanning software, rendering software (like 3DSMax and Rhino) and algorithmic modeling programs allow the company to recreate virtually anything with ease. Read more...
Published 31/05/2018 via 3ders.org
BRICKS & CERAMICS
University building is wrapped in "net curtain" of hollow blocks
Hollow clay bricks form the gridded facade of this faculty building at a university in the Polish city of Katowice, providing privacy and shade to the interiors while still allowing light to enter.​ The Department of Radio and Television building was designed for the University of Silesia by Warsaw studio Grupa 5 Architekci, Barcelona firm BAAS Arquitectura, and local office Małeccy Biuro Projektowe.​ Read more...
Published 28/05/2018 via dezeen.com
COMPOSITES & PLASTICS
The Ellipsicoon pavilion
Introducing Ben van Berkel / UNStudio’s Ellipsicoon – part of the REVOLUTION PRECRAFTED pavilion series. A place of rest, retreat and mindfulness, the Ellipsicoon creates a tranquil nomadic extension to the home: a detached, secluded space of immersion in nature. Designed and developed digitally, then handwoven by highly skilled craftsmen, the continuous sculptural surface of the pavilion is constructed from strands of 100% recyclable high-density polyethylene (HDPE). Read more...
Published 31/05/2018 via materialsforarchitecture.co.uk
CONCRETE & AGGREGATES
Akihisa Hirata stacks concrete boxes to create Tree-ness House
Japanese studio Akihisa Hirata Architecture Office has completed a mixed-use building in Tokyo featuring a jumbled composition of concrete rooms that create spaces for small balconies and gardens. The design of the building is inspired by the formation of a tree, with a central trunk supporting other parts evoking the branches and leaves. This led the architect to title the project the Tree-Ness house.
Read more...
Published 31/05/2018 via materialsforarchitecture.co.uk
METALS
Guelmim Airport is wrapped in a skin of metal perforated panels
The airport designed by the Rabat-based architecture office is located around three kilometers north of Guelmim, in southwest Morocco. It's expansive glazed surfaces are shielded from the harsh desert sun by a light-filtering façade made up of panels of metal-mesh that are suspended around the perimeter of the building. The metal surfaces are finished in a range of complementary colours to create a patchwork effect that recalls the region's traditional decorative styles. Read more...
Published 27/05/2018 via dezeen.com
SMART & BIO MATERIALS
100% recyclable cardboard tents have been pitching up at festivals
Dutch company offers a solution to one of music festival’s biggest problems – waste. Each year mountains of land waste are left behind formed of the things people can’t be bothered to deal with, one of which is tents. Offering a more eco-friendly, easy-to-throw-away alternative, designers wout kommer & jan portheine have created kartent, a 100% recyclable cardboard for the 3-day festival. Read more...
Published 30/05/2018 via designboom.com
TIMBER
Vancouver residence is wrapped in wood to resemble a beach house
A West Vancouver residence by Canadian firm Mcleod Bovell modern houses is designed to evoke the feel of a beach house: simple, casual and flexible. Commissioned by an Australian ex-patriate family, the g’day house supports a relaxed attitude toward daily life and helps its residents reconnect with a warm-weather lifestyle with indoor and outdoor space holding equal priority. Read more...
Published 31/05/2018 via designboom.com
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Have a story relevant to materials in construction and architecture that you'd like to share? Send it through...

Send it through to news@materialsforarchitecture.com for consideration. Find out more about the event, Materials for Architecture at www.materialsforarchitecture.com
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